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'Gwawrio'
Bluestone Collaboration Sculpture

Darren Yeadon, Hiroshi Ueta

more photos can be seen on     Bluestone Collaboration Sculpture photos on Flickr



The ground breaking piece of work with Hiroshi Ueta, Shodo Master  from Kyoto and Artst in Stone, Darren Yeadon. who lives and works in Goodwick.

The bluestone collaboration sculpture was part of the AKIN West Wales project for Fishguard Arts Society which built on already established connections with artists here and in Kyoto
Fishguard Arts Society has taken two exhibitions of works by members of Fishguard Arts  Society to the Arton Art Gallery, Kyoto in 2009 and 2012. In 2012 the exhibition in the Arton Gallery was a joint exhibition between the Gallery artists and FAS artists. In September 2016 we hosted four of these Japanese artists and held combined exhibitions, workshops and events here in South West Wales. Since the last visit to Japan we have maintained links with the Japanese artists generating goodwill and knowledge in Japan of Wales and its artists.

The work is carved in the local warm bluestone only found in the Preselis quarries which for millenia has been associated with healing and magical properties, its histories associated with Stonehenge.
The title ‘Gwawrio’ ‘Sunrise’  The Sun burst motif , important in Celtic Myth is a symbol of birth and rebirth, of awakening and creativity. The calligraphy on one side is the kanji for moon. The moon waxes and wanes, and harbours the power to regulate the tides. This power involves a rhythm that differs from that of the sun; it is a reflective and collaborative rhythm. The gravitational pull of the moon cannot be seen, but for this very reason, a special symbolic quality is attributed to the moon in Japan.
‘The Dolorite bluestones are at the end of a glacial morraine and are not extracted from the rock face. They are however of the same quality and chemistry as the Carn Menyn rocks which is a SSSI site. Darren Yeadon has an arrangement, and help, from the landowner to remove bluestones and transport them to his studio.’

This bluestone sculpture is a permanent embodiment of a Japan/Wales cultural co-operation with Fishguard and its’ environs over the last ten years